150th anniversary year of the 15th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution

Shared from the desk of Peter Hanes,     African North American Heritage News

NY Times 4/10/2020 column by Dr. Henry Louis Gates on the 150th anniversary year of the 15th Amendment of the U.S. Constitution being ratified granting African American men the right to vote–‘We Were Always Men’ One hundred and fifty years ago, Frederick Douglass understood the link between voting rights and manhood for African-Americans. 
 
The 15th Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the federal government and each state from denying a citizen the right to vote based on that citizen’s “race, color, or previous condition of servitude.” It was ratified on February 3, 1870, as the third and last of the Reconstruction. Passed by Congress February 26, 1869, and ratified February 3, 1870, the 15th amendment granted African American men the right to vote.  
 
Henry Louis Gates Jr. is the director of the Hutchins Center for African & African American Research at Harvard University and the author of “Stony the Road: Reconstruction, White Supremacy, and the Rise of Jim Crow and host of Reconstruction: America After the Civil War.”  
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